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Co-parenting tips for divorced parents

On Behalf of | Dec 20, 2021 | Divorce

Ideally, both parents should be involved in the child’s life even after a divorce unless there are overbearing reasons to the contrary. While co-parenting may seem easy, it is not always the case, especially if you are not on good terms with your co-parent.

It is necessary for parents to put their differences aside and focus on creating a conducive environment required for the children’s upbringing. Here are some tips that may come in handy when co-parenting.

Establish clear communication paths

In most cases, lack of communication with your co-parent may be a breeding ground for conflict. For instance, before making an important decision surrounding your child’s life, it is necessary to inform them or seek consent. In addition, if you intend to be away with the children for a more extended period than you had agreed with your co-parent, making them aware will prevent any misunderstanding.

Do not violate custody orders

If there is a custody order in place, make sure you abide by its terms. Do not deny the other parent visitation rights granted by the orders. However, remember that your children’s wellbeing always comes first, and if you feel it is not the case with the current custody arrangement, you may file a request to modify it.

Find a viable dispute resolution mechanism

Differences are bound to arise. How you deal with them determines how good of co-parents you and your ex will be. Therefore, it is worthwhile to have a predetermined way of handling disputes that should always guide you if any issues crop up. It is also important not to let your differences play out in front of the children — it could affect them emotionally or psychologically.

You may not get it right at first, but as long as your children’s interests and welfare are secured, you are on the right track. If not, you need to know the steps to take in rectifying the situation.